Collaborating

3 Ways Forward When You're Not Grant Ready

3 Ways Forward When You're Not Grant Ready

3 Ways Forward When You're Not Grant Ready

If you search online for information about “grant readiness,” more likely than not, you’ll come across information about becoming prepared to write a grant. You’ll likely to stumble upon a list of documents that you need to gather to be prepared to make sure that you are ready to write and submit a grant like the one I posted here . These lists are helpful. But they are lists about grant writing preparedness and not about grant readiness.

Grant readiness is about your organization or about your organization’s programs. It’s about whether or not your organization is an organization that is going to be considered a good investment in a funder’s eye. Grant funders do not want to rescue failures or organizations on the brink of failure. Instead, what they want is to invest in organizations that are a wise investment, organizations that have the capacity to succeed and to bring returns—not, of course, to them, but to the community, to the people or cause that they serve.

Whether or not an organization is grant ready include:

7 Groups of People Who Can Contribute Content to Your Nonprofit's Blog

7 Groups of People Who Can Contribute Content to Your Nonprofit's Blog

Ever visited a nonprofit's blog page to find...well, nothing? The Blank Blog is all too common on nonprofit websites.

A lot of nonprofit organizations resist beginning a blog or, if they have a blog, they let it languish because they can’t imagine how to keep it full of content. They don’t know what they could possibly say that would be interesting to their readers OR they are so overworked and understaffed they can't figure out how to complete one more task (e.g. writing blog posts).

The good news is that the people who love a nonprofit organization—donors, volunteers, board members, clients—would be interested in reading several things about the nonprofit, things that a nonprofit staff leader—especially one that has served a long time—might take for granted and see as routine and a nonprofit staff leader doesn't have to do it all himself.