development

How would you like to increase donations 600-800%?!?

How would you like to increase donations 600-800%?!?

What if you could do one thing in your development program and increase your donations 600 – 800%?!!

You can! According to Adrian Sargeant and Jen Shang in a whitepaper produced by Blackbaud and Hartsook Institutes, Growing Philanthropy in the United States, 600-800% is the amount by which you can increase a donor’s lifetime value simply by converting him or her to a monthly giver.

Consider:  if you’re typical donor makes a $25 or $35 check at the end of the year, you can increase his or her giving dramatically by signing them up to give $5, $10, or $15 each month instead. A monthly contributor who gives $5/month, for example, has increased their contribution 240% in one year.  Now, multiply that by the number of years he or she will give.

The math is pretty simple and straight-forward so the real question is how do you get started?

The answer isn’t rocket science:  Ask.

3 Great Reasons Companies Should Sponsor You

3 Great Reasons Companies Should Sponsor You

ponsorships can make the difference between an event being successful and an event being a failure.  Sponsorship dollars are critical.  Fortunately, sponsorship dollars are something that are easy to raise (yes, you read that right) – easy because they are a win-winCompanies receive several benefits from sponsorships:

  1. Corporate sponsorships provide companies benefits with their customers
  2. They increase employee productivity and loyalty, and
  3. They offer traditional marketing benefits like name/brand recognition in the community.

How to Recruit and Support Fundraising Volunteers

How to Recruit and Support Fundraising Volunteers

I’ll never forget 2007. 

That was the year that potential volunteers kept coming up to me at our volunteer recognition and recruitment event and saying “Hey! I’d like to help with fundraising!” By the end of the night, I had our golf tournament committee full, our silent auction committee full. I had volunteers signed up to ask for sponsorships, put up flyers around town, and hand-address appeal letters.  It was an incredible evening.  It seemed everyone wanted to be a fundraising volunteer. 

Like a Dog with a Bone

Like a Dog with a Bone

At this time of year, a good fundraiser is like a dog with a bone. She’s sunk her teeth into the organization’s fundraising goal and she’s unwilling to let go.

And with good reason. There are still things you can do to make your goals. Don’t give up on your goal or on yourself. There are 5 and ½ weeks left in the year. If you haven’t yet met your fundraising goals for the year – It’s not too late! 

Should a Board Have a Development Committee?

Should a Board Have a Development Committee?

In the last few years, a debate has emerged among nonprofit leaders about whether or not a board of directors should have a development committee.  The people who have suggested “no” make a very good point – that fundraising is the responsibility of every board member, not just a select few.  Many observe that on boards where there are fundraising committees, the board members tend to defer and overly rely on the handful of Board members who are on that committee.

As someone who has spent most of my career as a fundraising professional and a good chunk of the rest of it as an Executive Director without a fundraising staff (and, therefore, a fundraising professional in addition to being an E.D.), I believe a development committee is vital.

The Beauty of a Fundraising Plan

The Beauty of a Fundraising Plan

Several years ago, I took an Executive Director position at a nonprofit that serves several counties in Northeast Georgia. 

When I took the position, the organization was in trouble. The organization had ended several years in the red and had become overly reliant on a handful of dwindling government grants.

In self-defeating fashion, the organization’s board members had, become convinced that they couldn’t fundraise. Their last attempt to hold a fundraising event had resulted in a group of about 15 people—almost all board or staff—awkwardly hovering around the refreshments as the band played to an empty hall.