philanthropy

An Empathy Gap?

An Empathy Gap?

A new study conducted by researchers at Stanford, suggests that there is an "empathy gap" between men and women that affects charitable giving.  

To study differences in men and women and charitable giving, the researchers tested responses to appeals for support for a fictional organization they called the Coalition to Reduce Poverty.

The study broke the 1,1715-person sample into 5 test groups and compared the responses of men and women in each of the sub-samples. 

3 Great Reasons Companies Should Sponsor You

3 Great Reasons Companies Should Sponsor You

ponsorships can make the difference between an event being successful and an event being a failure.  Sponsorship dollars are critical.  Fortunately, sponsorship dollars are something that are easy to raise (yes, you read that right) – easy because they are a win-winCompanies receive several benefits from sponsorships:

  1. Corporate sponsorships provide companies benefits with their customers
  2. They increase employee productivity and loyalty, and
  3. They offer traditional marketing benefits like name/brand recognition in the community.

Dear Program Directors

Dear Program Directors

Dear Program Staff:

1. Just because we don’t work with our clients face-to-face, on a regular basis, doesn’t mean we don’t care about them. In fact, we care about them. 

Most of us could pretty easily work in sales, marketing, or communications positions in the corporate world (at much greater pay). But we choose to work here because we care, because we want to, because we love our clients and because we care about the mission.  Our care for our clients might look different than yours, but it’s there nonetheless.

Building the Donor Pipeline

Building the Donor Pipeline

The 2013 donor retention rates are in:  39%.  Annually, we lose 61% of all our donors.

With donor retention rates at all-time lows, one of the things that all nonprofit organizations have to work toward is acquiring new donors.  We have to keep the building the pipline by finding new donors.

With good reason, much has been written about how to retain donors and people across our profession, in workshops, webinars, conference presentations, journals, and blogs have advised, coached, and advocated that we take steps to stem the tide of donor attrition.  This is all excellent advice.  We do absolutely need to work to retain our existing donors—especially since an existing donor costs less to retain than a new one does to acquire—but even if we’re able to improve retention 10-20%, we’re still in need of aggressive annual efforts to acquire new donors.

The Beauty of a Fundraising Plan

The Beauty of a Fundraising Plan

Several years ago, I took an Executive Director position at a nonprofit that serves several counties in Northeast Georgia. 

When I took the position, the organization was in trouble. The organization had ended several years in the red and had become overly reliant on a handful of dwindling government grants.

In self-defeating fashion, the organization’s board members had, become convinced that they couldn’t fundraise. Their last attempt to hold a fundraising event had resulted in a group of about 15 people—almost all board or staff—awkwardly hovering around the refreshments as the band played to an empty hall.